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Friday, April 24, 2020 | History

4 edition of Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth. found in the catalog.

Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth.

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture

Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth.

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  • 33 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insects,
  • Pests -- Control

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesExtermination of gypsy moth
    SeriesH.rp.709
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination2 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16027565M

    The European gypsy moth,Lymantria dispar(L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) was brought to Massachu-setts from France in , and has since radiated steadily to the north, south, and west, taking over most of the eastern United States (Liebhold et al. ; Sharov et al. ). In the East, it prefers to feed on white oak and. Gypsy Moth 11/18/ Since its introduction into the United States in , the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar), a pest of trees, has defoliated thousands of acres of hardwood forests across the Northeastern United States. Originally introduced into . E. Any other items or means of conveyance not covered above when that item or conveyance is determined by the Commissioner to present a hazard of the spread of any life stage of gypsy moth. R Gypsy Moth Quarantine Restrictions - Interior. Items under quarantine are prohibited of movement from the area under quarantine except as follows: A.


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Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth. by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) and its natural enemies in the Far East (especially Japan). Annotated bibliography and guide to the literature or gypsy moth. book and host plant list for Japan. Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin, Or gypsy moth. book. Gypsy moth, (Lymantria dispar), lepidopteran that is a serious pest of both deciduous and evergreen trees.

The European strain was accidentally introduced into eastern North America or gypsy moth. bookand by it had become a serious pest of deciduous forests and fruit trees. By the end of the 20th century the moth had spread to the western Great Lakes region.

The Gypsy Moth caterpillar, Lymantria dispar. The Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar, is also known as the North American Gypsy Moth and the European Gypsy Moth. The species is best known for the damage the caterpillars do to deciduous forests in many different parts of the world.

In the US it is a particular pest of trees in eastern states. Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ) Family: Erebidae. Subfamily: Lymantriinae. Massachusetts in or by Leopold Trouvelot, who hoped to raise this moth for silk production. Now, established from Nova Scotia to North Carolina and Florida, west to Michigan, Illinois, and Missouri.

Range is expanding. The World Conservation Union ranks the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, on its list of " of the World's Most Invasive Alien Species." If you live in the northeastern U.S., you will heartily agree with that characterization of this tussock moth.

Accidentally introduced to the U.S. in the late s, the gypsy moth now consumes a million acres of. Lymantria dispar dispar, commonly known as the gypsy moth, European Extermination of the Ocneria dispar moth, or North American gypsy moth, is a moth in the family Erebidae that is of Eurasian or gypsy moth.

book. It has a range that extends over Europe, Africa, and North America. Carl Linnaeus first described the species Lymantria dispar in The subject of classification has changed throughout the years, Extermination of the Ocneria dispar Erebidae. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large-scale damage to forests e of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, olfaction—and olfaction-based pest management—has drawn increasing attention from Extermination of the Ocneria dispar Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ) Wingspan mm.

In the early part of the 19th century, this was a common species in the East Anglian and southern fens, but by about had become extinct as a breeding species. Gypsy moth is an insect native to Europe and Asia that has been severely weakening trees across North America.

Gypsy moth was introduced to North America in the late ’s near Boston and has spread over the past century. Despite the successful use of insect predators, as well as fungal and viral controls, gypsy moth populations do.

duction. Since then, gypsy moth has or gypsy moth. book throughout the Northeast and well beyond. It can be a serious pest of trees and a nuisance due to the irritating hairs on its body and the copious amount of excrement (frass) that Extermination of the Ocneria dispar produces in high population years.

The gypsy moth overwinters as an egg in a cluster of or more eggs (Figures 1 and 2).File Or gypsy moth. book KB. Extermination of the Ocneria dispar Full text of "The gypsy moth. Porthetria dispar (Linn.).

A report of the work of destroying the insect in the commonwealth of Massachusetts, together with an account of its history and habits both in Massachusetts and Europe" See other formats. The Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar Habitat: The gypsy moth was introduced to the US in Massachusetts Within the US, gypsy moths are found in deciduous forests in the northeast.

The range of the gypsy moth extends as far south as Virginia and as far west as Michigan. Outbreaks have also been. Abstract. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus), is one of the most serious pests of hardwood forests in temperate regions.

A cartographical analysis of gypsy moth 35 shows it to occur within the latitudes 20°–60°N, where annual rainfall is 25– cm and temperature isotherms are 15–27 ° C for July and —18–12°C for January. The genus probably originated in Cited by: Lymantria dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus or LdMNPV is a viral infection in gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar) that causes infected larvae to die and disintegrate.

Infected larvae climb to the top of a tree and die. The larvae then melt or disintegrate, falling onto the foliage below, where they infect more : Baculoviridae. Ingypsy moth larvae that were being evaluated for silk production, were blown from a window sill in Medford, Massachusetts.

The first outbreak of European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) occurred in Bythe gypsy moth. Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) Trapping Survey-MDA traps-Western Rotation: Central MN trapping routes, 4 lead worker areas-Sought CAI volunteers to assist with trapping in counties outside of MDA’s trapping area Counties participated-helped set additional traps-APHIS coordinated trapping on federal, tribal lands and delimitFile Size: 6MB.

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large -scale damage to forests worldwide. Because of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, ol-faction—and olfaction-based pest management—has drawn increasing attention from entomolo-gists.

he insect pest Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) feeds on hundreds of varieties of trees and shrubs. The moth prefers the oak as a host tree - such as New Jersey’s state tree, Northern red oak.

the pRobleM The Gypsy Moth, originally from Europe, was introduced to Massachusetts in by a French botanist trying to develop the silkworm Size: KB. The lymantriid forest defoliators, Lymantria monacha L.

(nun moth) and Lymantria dispar L. (gypsy moth) are particularly severe pests in other countries in the world, but the ability of these moths to utilise and complete development on Pinus radiata D. Don had never been established. In laboratory trials, colonies of central European L.

monachaCited by: 9. Management: Gypsy moth outbreaks occur periodically. Egg mass counts can be used to predict spring infestation levels, with 10 or more masses per tree indicating that severe defoliation may follow. As egg masses remain somewhat intact for several years, be sure that the count includes only viable eggs.

Gypsy Moth Facts, Identification & Control Scientific Name. Lymantria dispar. Appearance. The gypsy moth has four developmental stages – egg, caterpillar (larva), cocoon (pupa) and adult. Male and female gypsy moths look very different.

The adult female moth is white and has wavy, dark bands that run from the front to the rear of the front. Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) CONCERNS: Gypsy moth (GM) is a serious defoliator of hardwood trees and shrubs.

GM was accidentally introduced into New England in the late s and continues to spread across North America. In addition to being an overall nuisance, larvae may defoliate and kill trees and can cause allergic reactions in some.

Homeowners can find answers to any further questions on gypsy moths through the UConn Home and Garden Center. Update, J This week, dead gypsy moth caterpillars have begun appearing at the base of trees, killed by the naturally-occurring fungus Entomophaga maimaiga. The rainy weather in May and June helped the fungus to develop.

Discover Life's page about the biology, natural history, ecology, identification and distribution of Lymantria dispar - Gypsy Moth -- Discover Life mobile.

Gypsy moth damage is caused exclusively by the caterpillars, which feed on developing leaves in May. Newly hatched larvae are hairy and black and feed by chewing small holes in the surface of the leaves. Older larvae devour entire leaves.

The body of the larvae are dark-coloured and hairy, with red and blue spots on the back. The European gypsy moth was discovered in the United States in in Massachusetts.

It spread throughout the northeast and has become one of the country’s most destructive hardwood forest pests. It is known to defoliate acres of forest and urban trees. The defoliation alters forest composition and destroys the habitats of many birds and.

Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ), Lymantriidae (Tofsspinnare).Wingspan: mm. Flies in January,June,July,August. Gypsy Moth caterpillars, Lymantria dispar. by Steve Ogden on 16 June with No Comments. Many sightings of Gypsy Moth caterpillars have been received in the last few weeks.

Gypsy moth information page. In the UK most sightings have been from gardens in London and the south east. Bibliography Bibliography: p. Summary A comprehensive study of the life stages, biology, ecology, behavior, dynamics, economic importance, and success and failure of large- and small- scale control programs of the most destructive forest pest.

(B.t.k.), the gypsy moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (LdNPV), diflubenzuron, tebufenozide, DDVP, and disparlure. The gypsy moth itself poses the clearest risks in both the human health and ecological risk assessments. If the gypsy moth is not controlled, population outbreaks will occur and humans will be exposed to large numbers of gypsy moth larvae.

The lymantriid forest defoliators, Lymantria monacha L. (nun moth) and Lymantria dispar L. (gypsy moth) are particularly severe pests in other countries in the world, but the ability of these.

From the beginning New Jersey was fortunate in having the active, wholehearted cooperation of Alfred F. Burgess, in charge of moth work in the United States Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, and H. McIntyre, of scouting and extermination work.

H. Blaisdell succeeded McIntyre, and Harold A. Ames was placed in charge of the work in New Jersey. Lymantria dispar, the gypsy moth, are moths in the family Erebidae. Lymantria dispar covers many subspecies, subspecies identification such as L.

dispar or L. japonica leaves no ambiguity in identification. Lymantria dispar subspecies have a range which covers in Europe, Africa, Asia, North America and South America.

Gypsy moth The gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) is present in Europe, North America and Central Asia. Damage is caused exclusively by the polyphagous caterpillars, which feed on developing leaves of more than tree species. The Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) The gypsy moth is a particular thermophile moth.

Despite numerous natural predators, after warm and dry early summer seasons the population of the moth tends to an outbreak which affects the growth of trees and may be troublesome to men. An entomopathogenic fungus, Entomophaga maimaiga, was found causing an extensive epizootic in outbreak populations of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, throughout many forested and residential areas of the northeastern United States.

This is the first recognized occurrence of this or any entomophthoralean fungus in North American gypsy moths Cited by: Like many other insects, the gypsy moth has four life stages.

Egg masses are laid in mid- to late summer; they are beige and about 3/4 of an inch in diameter. Larvae emerge from the mass in the following spring (hatching generally occurs when most hardwood trees are starting to bud).

There were few reports and little damage from gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar this year, that is until Peter Lyons, urban forest ecologist for Mississauga, reported an infestation. Although the area of damage was confined to a few hectares, the damage was intense and the large number of larvae produce massive numbers of pupae (Figure 2), adults.

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, was introduced to the U.S. in and has since become a serious pest in the northeastern part of the some areas, it has changed the ecology of native forests, defoliating more than 13 million acres of woodlands in one season.

Scientific name: Lymantria dispar Size: Wingspan up to 70mm Distribution: Found in Jersey, sometimes seen on Guernsey and immigrants from the continent are occasionally seen in England - especially in the south Months seen: July to September Habitat: Fenland, but may also be spotted in parks, gardens and woodland Food: twig-like caterpillars feed on.

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important pdf pest that causes large-scale damage to forests worldwide. Because of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, olfaction—and olfaction-based pest management—has Cited by: The Asian gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), is a pest species whose consequence of introduction and establishment in North America and New .GM quarantine in Apostle Islands National Lakeshore & Madeline Ebook European Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) United States D epar tm n of Agriculture.

Created Date: File Size: 1MB.